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Sensitive FM Transmitter Bug
Posted on Monday, August 20, 2012   •   Category: FM Transmitters

Sensitive FM Transmitter Bug

This easy to build FM transmitter bug can transmit voice to exceptionally good range. Tune trimmer to hear the signal to your near radio. Transmitter frequency range is 88-108 MHz. Max current consumption is 30mA. You can power the fm transmitter bug with a 9Volt Battery, or you can plug a power supply to feed in 9-12 Volts. That bug will pick even a low whisper or even the sound of a breath well far from the microphone. Great spy transmitter equipment.




6 Watt FM Transmitter Amplifier
Posted on Saturday, June 23, 2012   •   Category: FM Transmitters

6 Watt FM Transmitter Amplifier

After building FM transmitter I decided to build a 6W RF Transmitter amplifier for the FM band to get more power and we chose to copy a 6 Watt design built around 2SC1971 RF power transistor. We were not satisfied with finished result and decided to replace the fixed capacitors around the pcb inductors with variable capacitors, this is much better and possible to tune to your transmitter frequency.




Wideband DTV UHF Antenna TV Amplifier
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2012   •   Category: Antennas

Wideband DTV UHF Antenna TV Amplifier

This HD TV UHF wideband amplifier(Ultra High Frequency amplifier) has a total gain of 10 to 15 dB in the 400 – 850 MHz domain frequency so it can be used where the tv signal is weak. For this UHF antenna tv amplifier to work correctly you need to cut the components pins as short as possible. C1, C2, C6, C7 are SMD type ( surface mounted ). This antenna tv amplifier or uhf wideband amplifier need to be build inside of a metal box and then connected close to the tv antenna.




KT88 Tube Power Amplifier Class A
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2012   •   Category: Amplifiers

KT88 Tube Power Amplifier Class A

Single Ended Valve Triode Amplifier has not same tone with Push Psu Amplifier. Over 90% of Amplifiers are push pull, and push pull amplifier does not 2nd harmonic and off course does not get 2nd 4th, 6th harmonic vs SE has 2nd, 4th, 6th harmonic. Push pull has minor distortion than SE Amplifier.2nd harmonic is make good tone for Music.not too much and not less than.feel good sound get from Single Ended Amplifiers with high efficiency speakers from 88dB/m to 100dB/m. I means Single Ended Amplifier is almost Single Ended Triode Amplifier.or Penthode but wired Triode. Tone is Different.good for Jazz and small room Classic.




1 Watt QRP Power Transmitter
Posted on Friday, June 8, 2012   •   Category: FM Transmitters

1 Watt QRP Power Transmitter

The 1 watt 20 meter QRP transmitter with VXO. This is a nice QRP transmitter that can be used in combination of one of the simple receivers. Normally these designs have only two transistors: one is the X-tal oscillator and the second the final amplifier. A good example is my first QRP rig that is also described somewhere on this site. Here the VXO (Variabele X-tal Oscillator) has a tuning range of 16 kHz. This VXO is buffered with an extra driver stage for a better frequency stability and a varicap diode is used instead of a variabele capacitor. An extra transistor is added for keying the transmitter with a low keying current. What you can do with such a simple 1 watt QRP power transmitter. This is a real low power transmitter, so do not expect that you can do everything with it but... When conditions are normal, you can easily make many QSO's during one afternoon with stations with distances upto 2000 km with a simple inverted V wire dipole antenna! From Europe, I did even make QSO's across the Ocean!




500mW PLL FM Transmitter 88-108MHz
Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2012   •   Category: FM Transmitters

500mW PLL FM Transmitter 88-108MHz

This PLL transmitter is controlled and the frequency is very stable and can be programmed digitally. Transmitter will work 88-108 MHz and output power up to 500mW. With a small change can set the frequency of 50-150 MHz. The output power is often set to several watts with transistors. So therefore I decided to build a simple transmitter with great performances. The frequency of this transmitter can easily be changed by software and space / compress air coil. This transmitter is the oscillator colpitts. Oscillator is a VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) which is set by the PLL circuit and PIC micro controller. This oscillator is called the Colpitts oscillator and voltage controlled to achieve the FM (frequency modulation) and PLL control.




Wideband RF Field Strength Meter
Posted on Wednesday, May 23, 2012   •   Category: Test and Measurement

Wideband RF Field Strength Meter

Field strength meter is extremely useful when working with RF devices. It can be used to quickly diagnose whether a transmitter circuit is working, and can be used to detect RF signals in the environment. The simplest field strength meter could be built with a tuned LC circuit and a germanium diode, just like the way of a building a crystal radio except replacing the ear piece with a high sensitivity current meter. While this approach fits the needs of most simple applications, it has a pretty narrow frequency range (~100 MHz) and requires tuning the LC circuit to the correct frequency before measurements can be made and the design can become complicated if wider frequency range tuning is desired.




50V Bench Power Supply
Posted on Monday, May 21, 2012   •   Category: Power Supplies

50V Bench Power Supply

An 50v bench power supply can be made using electronic diagram below which is designed using LM10 op amp and 2n3055 transistors. This LM10 2n3055 50v bench power supply allows an output voltage regulation in a range between 0 and 50 volts and the output current can be limited to a maximum of 2A. Output voltage increases linearly with the amount of resistance potentiometer P1, while the current can be adjusted linear using potentiometer P3. Potentiometer P2 serves to regulate maximum output current (maximum value is 2A).




Class-A Mosfet Headphone Amplifier
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2012   •   Category: Amplifiers

Class-A Mosfet Headphone Amplifier

Not thrilled with how a computer soundcard drove my 32ohm headphones so I decided to build myself class-A mosfet headphone amplifier. As with most of my projects, the goal was to keep it simple, keep cost down and try use some salvaged parts. This is a simple do-it-yourself (DIY) headphone amplifier project that is fashioned primarily after the Class A MOSFET Headphone Driver project by Greg Szekeres and to some extent Mark's DIY Class A 2SK1058 MOSFET Amplifier Project. The amplifier concept is simple and follows a typical single-ended class A circuit utilizing an active constant current source (CCS) in place of a passive resistor. A CCS doubles the efficiency of the circuit over that where a passive load resistor is used, bringing it to a maximum of 25%.




1.5V - 30V 1.5A LM317 Variable Power Supply
Posted on Sunday, May 13, 2012   •   Category: Power Supplies

1.5V - 30V 1.5A LM317 Variable Power Supply

This is a basic universal variable Power Supply voltage regulator circuit using an LM317, 3-terminal regulator in a TO-220package. The Universal Power Supply output voltage can be set to anywhere in the range 1.5V to 30V by selecting two resistances. By using a potentiometer, R2, as one of the resistors you can dial up the output voltage wanted. Either AC or DC input can be supplied to the PCB via a socket or terminal block. Connection can be either way around. This is because we have provided a bridge rectifier on board. The input DC voltage to the regulator must be at least 2.5V above the required output voltage. An off/on switch is provided. For many applications (say 12V at 60mA) a heat sink will not be necessary. The LM317 will provide slightly higher output voltages than 30 volts. However, for most hobbyists over 30V will not be needed. So to make a small PCB we have used some electrolytic capacitors rated to 35 volts. To be safe for continuous operation the maximun input DC voltage to the regulator should not be over 33V. With a 2.5V to 3.0V drop across the regulator this will give a regulated output of 30V. You can draw up to 1.5A from the LM317. If you need higher then use an LM338T rated to 5A.




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