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RF Control for Home Appliance
Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011   •   Category: Remote Control


This circuit consists of Transmitter and Receiver section. The circuit can be used to control home appliances within a range of 30 meters. In open area, you can expect a range of 100 meters. The circuit comprises HT12 Encoder and Decode IC's. HT12 Encoder is used in the transmitter (remote) circuit where as HT12E is used in receiver circuit. The Encode IC encodes the 4 bits of data and transmit it serially to to RF Transmitter module. These 433Mhz transmitter and receiver modules operate using ASK Modulation.


Light RF Remote Control
Posted on Sunday, May 1, 2011   •   Category: Remote Control


This is another remote control for my RF light switch. Pretty much the same as before but on a smaller PCB. Also ended up putting it in an old Maxim sample box. I found a couple of button nubs in my junk box so decided to go with those. Even so I had to raise the buttons with pieces of rubber. A piece of tape keeps the buttons from falling out when the box is opened and also adds some tolerance for misalignment.


Simple IR Remote Receiver with Decoder
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2011   •   Category: Remote Control


The function of the device is very simple. Any IR remote than can be programmed to use the Sony protocol will work. The module outputs the device code (TV/VCR/DVD/AUX) and the button pressed, so the device can be used on as many different projects as your remote has devices (usually four). The numeric keys output the number of the key (0 outputs a 0, etc.). The function keys all output unique numbers. Note that not all buttons are available depending on which device you have selected. The VCR setting seems to use most of the keys on the remote. Also note that the first key pressed after the device is powered up does not output what it should. All subsequent numbers are correct. Luckily, all of the numbers so generated make a number different than any of the key codes, so it doesn't cause any problem. This could even be used to let the device know if it has just been powered up or rebooted. I have no idea why it does this.


100W HI-FI MOSFET Amplifier
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2011   •   Category: Headphone Amplifiers


Here is a simple 100W HI-FI MOSFET Amplifier. The main feature of this amplifier is a simple design and assembly. Simplicity of the circuit by looking at the circuit you expect amplifier to be simple. It should be noted that many hi-end amplifiers have a very simple but good quality designs. General technological theory is due to fewer parts, fewer problems. Additionally power to supplement your system is quite effective. Power supply transformer is very important. 8 Ohm output for a 35 - 0 to 35 V and at least 3 amps per power amplifier is recommended that a transformer can be transferred. Naturally, the two substations will be required for stereo use.


LM386 Audio Probe Amplifier
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2011   •   Category: Test and Measurement


LM386 audio probe amplifier is an essential tool for troubleshooting audio stages in audio related circuits such as amplifiers, oscillators, function generators, phone circuits, radios and lots of our other projects. It is a very handy piece of test equipment that can be built on pre-drilled board and will make a perfect addition to your electronic collection. There are lots of things that can go wrong with an audio stage. It can produce distortion or a “hollow” sound, go weak or simply fail altogether. Likewise tone circuits can present a number of faults and it is very handy to be able to “hear” what is going wrong. It is not sufficient to measure the DC voltages on these stages. This only gives a partial picture of the conditions and does not tell you the quality of the audio being processed. To determine this you need a piece of test equipment that will let you see or hear what is being processed. Some of the projects you can test with the Mini Bench Amplifier are tone circuits while others are audio circuits. Tone circuits and audio stages are surprisingly difficult to test unless you have an audio probe or a oscilloscope. Oscilloscope is an ideal piece of equipment but if your budget does not extend this far, the next best thing is an audio probe.


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