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Simple FM Radio Receiver
Posted on Thursday, September 26, 2013   •   Category: FM Radio / Receivers


This FM radio receiver circuit is very simple to build and is powered by just a single 1.5V battery cell. Receiver consists of a regenerative rf stage, TR1, followed by a two of three-stage audio amplifier, TR2 to TR4. In some areas 3 stages of audio amplification may not be necessary, in which case TR3 and its associated components can be omitted and the free end of capacitor C5 connected to the collector of TR2. The critical part of the fm radio receiver is the first stage, TR1/VC1, where the wirings must be kept as short as possible. Coil L1 is formed by winding 8 turns of 1mm (20 swg) enamelled copper wire on a 6 mm diameter former, which is then removed. After that L1 should be stretched carefully and evenly to a length of about 13mm.


1 Watt PLL FM Broadcast Transmitter
Posted on Monday, September 23, 2013   •   Category: FM Transmitters


This is a 1 Watt PLL FM broadcast transmitter. The RF output varies from 500mW to about 1.2W depending on the frequency selected and RF output transistor used. Motorola 2N4427 always seems to work well. Transmitter uses CMOS PLL VCO that prevents the frequency drifts. The frequency is selected via DIP switches. The transmitter is supplied by 12V DC and can also be powered from the battery.


Two Wire I2C Arduino LCD Display
Posted on Friday, September 20, 2013   •   Category: Arduino


In this tutorial you will learn how to build a simple serial 16x2 LCD display that is controlled via Arduino board by only two wires. The magic behind is done by the PCF8574 chip, an I/O expander that communicates with the micro-controller by using I2C protocol. The PCF8574 is a quick and easy solution to extending and adding output/input ports to Arduino. The chip connects to a standard I2C bus and adds an additional 8 output ports. A total of 8 LCD displays can be connected to the same two wire I2C bus with each board having a different address.


Simple FM Transmitter
Posted on Friday, September 13, 2013   •   Category: FM Transmitters


This FM transmitter is about the simplest and most basic FM transmitter it is possible to build and have a useful transmitting range. It is surprisingly powerful despite its small component count and 3V operating voltage. It will easily penetrate over three floors of an apartment building and go over 300 meters in the open air. The circuit we use is based on a proven Australian design. It may be tuned anywhere in the FM band. Or it may be tuned outside the commercial M band for greater privacy. (Of course this means you must modify your FM radio to be able to receive the transmission or have a broad-band FM receiver.) The output power of this FM Tx is below the legal limits of many countries (eg, USA and Australia). However, some countries may ban ALL wireless transmissions without a license. It is the responsibility of the builder to check the legal requirements for the operation of this circuit and to obey them.


Portable FM Transmitter
Posted on Sunday, September 1, 2013   •   Category: FM Transmitters


This portable FM Transmitter is easy to build. I have used a pair of BC548 transistors in this circuit. Although not strictly RF transistors, they still give good range. Transmitter is powered by 9V battery. The coil L1 consists of 7 turns on a quarter inch plastic former with a tuning slug. The tuning slug is adjusted to tune the transmitter. Actual range on my prototype tuned from 70MHz to around 120MHz. The aerial is a few inches of wire. Lengths of antenna wire should be 1 - 2 feet. The circuit is basically a radio frequency (RF) oscillator that operates around 70-120 MHz. Audio from audio jack is fed into the audio amplifier stage built around the first transistor. Output from the collector is fed into the base of the second transistor where it modulates the resonant frequency of the tank circuit by varying the junction capacitance of the transistor. Junction capacitance is a function of the potential difference applied to the base of the transistor. The tank circuit is connected in a Colpitts oscillator circuit.


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