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Stepper Motor Controller
Category: Stepper Motors

Stepper motor driver that will allow you to precisely control a unipolar stepper motor through your computer's parallel port. With a stepper motor you can build a lot of interesting gadgets such as robots, elevator, PCB drilling mill, camera panning system, automatic fish feeder, etc. If you have never worked with stepper motors before you will surely have a lot of fun with this project.




Stepper Motor Driver
Category: Stepper Motors

Stepper motors are everywhere in electronics these days. There are two main types of stepper motors: 1. Bipolar motors. These have two coils and are controlled by changing the direction of the current flow through the coils in the proper sequence. These motors have only four wires and cannot be connected to this kit. See our Kit 1406 for a Bipolar Stepper driver Kit. 2. Unipolar motors. These have two center-tapped coils which are treated as four coils. These motors can have five, six or eight wires. Five-wire motors have the two center-taps commoned internally and brought out as one wire (Fig 1). Six-wire motors bring out each center-tap separately. The two center-taps need to be commoned externally (Fig 2). Eight-wire motors bring out both ends of each coil. The four “center-taps” are joined externally to form one wire. In each case the center-tap(s) are connected to a positive motor power supply. Unipolar motors may be connect as bipolar ones by not using the ‘+’ wires. A stepper motor has no brushes or contacts. It is basically a synchronous motor with the magnetic field electronically switched to rotate the armature magnet around. The Internet is where to get all the explanation about steppers. Just google ‘stepper motor’ and you will find tens of sites. In particular, look for ‘Jones on Stepper motors’ (it comes up top of the list when I did it just now) and read it. If you look at the other references you will find that the circuit in this kit has been around for many years in various forms. The latest publication was in Silicon Chip, 5/2002, and I have based this circuit on it.




1000W AC Motor Speed Controller
Category: Stepper Motors

This triac based AC motor speed controller circuit is designed for controlling the speed of AC motors like drill machines, fans, vacuums, etc. The speed of the motor can be controlled by changing the setting of P1 potentiometer. The setting of P1 determines the phase of the trigger pulse that fires the triac. The circuit incorporates a self-stabilizing technique that maintains the speed of the motor even when it is loaded.




6-Transistor H-bridge
Category: Stepper Motors

This is the six transistor "Tilden style" H-bridge; while not as old as the original "basic H-bridge," this goes "way back," and is the basis for many BEAM driver circuits * Up to 800 mA capacity (using PN2222 and PN2907 transistors) * 30 connections per bridge (so, 30 holes if you make a PCB) * Not "smoke-proof" (i.e., it can't handle drive voltage in both directions at once)




Basic Stepping Motor Control Circuits
Category: Stepper Motors

This section of the stepper tutorial deals with the basic final stage drive circuitry for stepping motors. This circuitry is centered on a single issue, switching the current in each motor winding on and off, and controlling its direction. The circuitry discussed in this section is connected directly to the motor windings and the motor power supply, and this circuitry is controlled by a digital system that determines when the switches are turned on or off.




Bidirectional H-Bridge DC-Motor Motion Controller
Category: Stepper Motors

In applications requiring absolute accuracy in the speed control of dc servo motors, there’s no substitute for the traditional tachometer-based feedback loop. But for somewhat less demanding situations, adequate accuracy often can be achieved without the complication and expense of a tach. This can be done by taking advantage of the built-in electromechanical constants of the motor itself.




Control stepping motor via USB interface
Category: Stepper Motors

This is an example that demonstration how to control some devices via USB interface.The PC software program with delphi. Feature: - CPU PIC18F4550 with full speed USB interface at 48MHz. - USB 2.0 compliance - Use on-chip USB driver - Control 1 stepping motor. - MPLAB C18 for firmware at USB devices side. - Delphi 6 for PC Host software. USB devices side Figure 1. is the schematic for this example.PIC18F4550 is the main devices that communicate with PC and control stepping motor. The power supply came from +5V Vbus for circuit except +Vmotor which must use external power supply that depend on stepping motor requires. If you add more components into circuit that drawn total current more than 250mA you should be use +5V external power supply instead Vbus.Becuase Vbus can supplies current not more than 250mA and don't forgot to disconnect Vbus out of circuit.




Control stepping motor via USB interface
Category: Stepper Motors

This is an example that demonstration how to control some devices via USB interface.The PC software program with delphi. Feature : - CPU PIC18F4550 with full speed USB interface at 48MHz. - USB 2.0 compliance - Use on-chip USB driver - Control 1 stepping motor. - MPLAB C18 for firmware at USB devices side. - Delphi 6 for PC Host software.




Driving Bipolar Stepper Motors
Category: Stepper Motors

Stepper motors are devices, which convert electrical impulses into discrete mechanical rotational movements. In a typical stepper motor, power is applied to two coils. Two stator cups formed around each of these coils, with pole pairs mechanically offset by ½ a pole pitch, become alternately energized North and South magnetic poles. Between the two stator-coil pairs the offset is ¼ of a pole pitch.




Driving CDROM Stepper Motor with Arduino
Category: Stepper Motors

H-bridge is frequently used to control DC motors and stepper motors. When controlling a bipolar stepper motor, two full H-bridges are needed. There are many H-bridge ICs (like L298, MPC17529 and SN754410 which is a quad half H-bridge) for just that purpose. But if you are on a budget, you may want to consider building a dual H-bridge yourself. The following schematic shows a simple dual H-bridge using eight general purpose transistors (2N3904 and 2N3906). Given the maximum current of roughly 200mA, this circuit can be used to drive a small bipolar stepper motor operating between 5V and 12V, such as the stepper motors found in most floppy drives and CD / DVD drives.




Full-featured Dual H-bridge
Category: Stepper Motors

Probably the simplest, reversible drive circuit is the H-Bridge. Some BEAMbots use H-bridge motor drivers; many more use an H-bridge variant of some sort. Here's a simple conceptual schematic: Image A basic H-Bridge has 4 switches, relays, transistors, or other means of completing a circuit to drive a motor. In the above diagram, the switches are labeled A1, A2, B1, B2. Since each of the four switches can be either open or closed, there are 24 = 16 combinations of switch settings. Many are not useful and in fact, several should be avoided since they short out the supply current (e.g., A1 and B2 both closed at the same time). There are four combinations that are useful:




Plane Motor Controller with High-Rate ESC, BEC and Brake
Category: Stepper Motors

This electronic speed control (ESC) for brushed motors combines the features of two of my earlier designs. One was a high-rate 30A ESC with a brake, and the other a high-rate 12A ESC with a BEC (receiver battery eliminator circuit).




Plane Motor Controller with High-Rate ESC, BEC and Brake
Category: Stepper Motors

This electronic speed control (ESC) for brushed motors combines the features of two of my earlier designs. One was a high-rate 30A ESC with a brake, and the other a high-rate 12A ESC with a BEC (receiver battery eliminator circuit).




Stepper Motor Connections
Category: Stepper Motors

Stepper motors are available in many different models. One of the main differences is the number of connections. That can vary from 4 to 8 wires or terminals. The oldest models, for the unipolar drives have 5 or 6 leads. The newest ones for the bipolar drives and do have only 4 leads.




Stepper Motor controller
Category: Stepper Motors

There are many kind of stepper motors. Unipolar type, Bipolar type, Single-phase type, Multi-phase type. Single-phase stepper motor is often used for quartz watch. On this page, I will explain the operation principle of the 2-phase unipolar PM type stepper motor. In the PM type stepper motor, a permanent magnet is used for rotor and coils are put on stator. The stepper motor model which has 4-poles is shown in the figure on the left. In case of this motor, step angle of the rotor is 90 degrees.




Stepper Motor Controller Connection Diagrams
Category: Stepper Motors

Four-Wire Connection The ULN2003 / MC1413 is a 7-bit 50V 500mA TTL-input NPN darlington driver. This is more than adequate to control a four phase unipolar stepper motor such as the KP4M4-001.




Stepper Motor Driver (74194)
Category: Stepper Motors

Probably the simplest, reversible drive circuit is the H-Bridge. Some BEAMbots use H-bridge motor drivers; many more use an H-bridge variant of some sort. Here's a simple conceptual schematic: Image Based on the SN74LS194 - Bidirectional Universal Shift Register the circuit is designed to drive UNIPOLAR type stepper motors and provides only basic control functions - Forward, Reverse, Stop and Speed adjustment. The only step angle for this driver is the design step angle for the motor. The circuit is not complex and is cheaper than many dedicated driver/controller devices and the parts are easy to find.




Working With Stepper Motors
Category: Stepper Motors

We've all experimented with small "hobby motors", or free-spinning DC motors. Have you ever tried to position something accurately with one? It can be pretty difficult. Even if you get the timing just right for starting and stopping the motor, the armature does not stop immediately. DC motors have a very gradual acceleration and deceleration curves; stabilization is slow. Adding gearing to the motor will help to reduce this problem, but overshoot is still present and will throw off the anticipated stop position. The only way to effectively use a DC motor for precise positioning is to use a servo. Servos usually implement a small DC motor, a feedback mechanism (usually a potentiometer with attached to the shaft by gearing or other means), and a control circuit which compares the position of the motor with the desired position, and moves the motor accordingly. This can get fairly complex and expensive for most hobby applications.




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