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70 - 120MHz FM Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This simple one chip FM receiver / TV tuner will allow you to receive frequencies from 70 up to 120MHz. With this small receiver it is possible to pickup TV stations, entire 88 - 108MHz FM band, aircraft conversation and many other private transmissions. It is a perfect companion to any FM Transmitter especially if FM band in your area is very crowded. TDA7000 receiver offers very good sensitivity therefore it will even allow you to pickup weaker signals that cannot be heard on conventional FM receivers.




Simple FM Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

With the TDA 7000 you can build an FM radio with a minimum of components; most of them so easy to manage...like the ceramic capacitors that do not require polarization...and only two resistors. The components you will employ will be of small dimensions and low cost. Even the integrated circuit itself, the TDA 7000, is not of great cost.




27 MHz Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This is a simple RF receiver mainly for low-distance digital radio receiver application. The analog output of this circuit should be connected to a schmitt-trigger signal conditioning circuit with a proper value capacitor (from collector of T3). L1 for 27Mhz is about 10 turns, 6 mm diameter coil body.




27MHz / 49 MHz Walkie Talkie
Category: FM Receivers

Lots of people are requesting walkie-talkie and RF remote control schematics, so here is some. Building these circuits needs special equipment and expertise in RF circuits. If you are going to experiment with these circuits, please note that I did not build them, and I am not able to help you with any details. If you have no experience in RF, I suggest that you choose the easy way and buy a ready-made RF module. Otherwise you can realize you have an exact copy of a circuit in your hand, still it doesn't work the way it should.




4 Transistor FM Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This is a pocket sized receiver I built in 1994. The idea was to make a simple but useable receiver running off 3V. My previous 6 transistor receiver was more bulky, requiring 12V. This meant 10 x AA cells. I designed and made a PCB, and constructed a small aluminium case to keep the receiver as comact as possible. There is nothing unusual with this design. The detector uses a simple Colpitts oscillator and is of a type commonly used in other super regen receivers. Of course it is self quenched. Sensitivity with this type of detector is relatively low, but it's simple and easy to get working. As always, I provided a regeneration control to set the optimum operating point; ie. max sensitivity and minimum SCA/stereo subcarrier beat.




Aircraft / Airplane Radio Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

The communications between commercial aircraft and the ground can be interesting, amusing and sometimes even disturbing. However radios that receive the approximately 220MHz to 400MHz band commonly used for aircraft (both military and commercial) are not easily found. And scanners can be complicated, large and expensive. With an easy to build circuit such as this one, everyone can enjoy listening in on these conversations.




Aircraft Transmission Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This passive airband receiver is basically an amplified "crystal radio" designed to receive nearby aircraft transmissions on 121 - 133 MHz frequency. Useful for listening to the pilot transmissions. The input tuned cct 'L' is a 2 turn loop, with 30mm diameter measured at 0.15uH on my LC Meter which intercepts RF directly as opposed to an LC cct fed with external aerial. Tuning capacitor is a 30pF Philips Beehive trimmer, with a short length of plastic tube glued - as a tuning shaft. Capacitance runs from 28 to 7pF; which by formula gives a frequency range of 77 - 155MHz. Detector uses a biased 1N5711 (or similar) schottky diode with lowest forward-biassed voltage drop. The two 10M resistors bias the detector diode and the op-amp input near mid-rail for better detector efficiency. LM358 dual op-amp draws less than 1 ma so the battery drain is minimal. Insertion of earphones plug completes supply circuit and acts as an on/off switch. 9V battery fits neatly inside a 30mm x 130mm long PVC tube.




AM Radio built around LM555
Category: FM Receivers

AM radio built around 555 timer chip. The only active device (silicon, germanium, or otherwise) is the LM555. The tuning is accomplished with an inductor and a capacitor, and the LM555 acts as an AM demodulator and class-D power amplifier to drive the speaker. You may be wondering how all this is accomplished with a 555. Hereís how the circuit works: The AM radio signal is tuned by inductor L, which is 300 turns of wire on a 1/2 inch diameter cardboard tube made out of a paper roll, along with the 100pF variable capacitor. One end of the parallel configuration of L and C connects to an antenna (surprisingly long!) and the other end connects to a ground wire which is tied to the AC outlet ground (old books tell you to ground it to a water pipe). So far this is exactly like an AM crystal radio. The 555 timer is configured as a pulse width modulator in a non-traditional configuration. If I used the standard approach and connected the input to the CV pin, the low impedance of the pin would prevent the circuit from receiving any radio signals. I had to invert the circuit and tie both high impedance analog pins, Threshold and Trigger to the radio signal input. This is the reason why the CMOS version of the 555 timer performs much better than the standard bipolar, which has higher input bias current.




Crystal Detector Radio Receiver Set Varactor Varicap Capacitor Diode Tuned
Category: FM Receivers

Traditionally, in a crystal detector radio tuned circuits, a mechanical type variable capacitor is used. For those of you who would like to eliminate this mechanical component, here is a modern version of the classic detector set. This radio, as shown on Figure 1, uses a varactor diode instead of the usual mechanical rotary device. The varactor is also known as a variable capacitance or a varicap diode. It provides an electrically controllable capacitance, which can be used in many different circuits. Varactors are small and inexpensive, which makes their use advantageous in many applications. Its disadvantages are a lower Q (quality), nonlinearity, lower voltage rating and a more limited capacitance range. A tuned circuit with a higher Q has a narrow pass-band that makes it better able to pick out a station of many equally strong. A lower Q tuned circuit has a wider pass band. It allows more neighbor stations through and makes listening to either radio stations frustrating. Frequency change with a varactor diode equipped tuned circuit is as simple as a voltage change.




Direct SW Receiver for AM, AM-SSB & CW Signals
Category: FM Receivers

Home Ľ Radio Ľ Direct SW Receiver for AM, AM-SSB & CW Signals Direct SW Receiver for AM, AM-SSB & CW Signals Advertisement SSB stands for Single Side Band, which signifies the amplitude - modulated signal which gets its signal carrier and one sideband suppressed in the transmitter. Carrier suppressing gives huge savings in transmission power (the power necessary to accomplish the desired reach of the signal is significantly smaller than in the conventional - type transmitters), and cancellation of one sideband makes the signal have its spectrum two times narrower, allowing twice as many transmitters as usual to be placed into the same bandwidth.




FM / AM Regenerative Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

The following is a design for a separately quench super regen receiver I first tried in early 1992. It worked far better than any other solid state design, so I built a portable version for use during my commuting from the Blue Mountains to Sydney on the train. Running off 10x AA nicads, this gave me a weeks listening before recharging. Only recently, I submitted the basic circuit to Silicon Chip, whereupon it was published in the April 2003 issue (and I won a nice true RMS meter as a result). My portable version differs in that I use varicap tuning, the output transformer has a 1K primary, and the output transistor is a BC108, with bias components to suit. It also uses the headphone lead for the aerial.




FM Broadcast Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

Here's a portable FM broadcast radio receiver for reception of FM broadcast band based around FET transistor. The topology is a classic grounded-gate FET VHF Hartley oscillator. The drain resonator inductance is centre-tapped with feedback to the source through a small capacitance. By tapping down towards the cold-end of the coil the feedback isn't as critical as your usual source-drain capacitor feedback and it tends to be far less difficult to get to work across a broad range of frequencies. The RFC to an RC source circuit to implement self-quenching is very traditional for super-regenerative detectors. The quench gets frequency-modulated somewhat by the drain current, so it varies with signal strength and the recovered modulation, this is typical for self-quenched circuits.




FM Radio Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This simple fm radio receiver circuit consists of a regenerative rf stage, TR1, followed by a two of three-stage audio amplifier, TR2 to TR4. In some areas 3 stages of audio amplification may not be necessary, in which case TR3 and its associated components can be omitted and the free end of capacitor C5 connected to the collector of TR2.




FM Radio Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This simple fm radio receiver circuit consists of a regenerative rf stage, TR1, followed by a two of three-stage audio amplifier, TR2 to TR4. In some areas 3 stages of audio amplification may not be necessary, in which case TR3 and its associated components can be omitted and the free end of capacitor C5 connected to the collector of TR2.




FM Radio Receiver using TDA7088
Category: FM Receivers

This tiny receiver is not much bigger than an AA cell. It is powered off two LR44 button cells, which are expensive and I assume wouldn't last terribly long. I'll be on the lookout for LR44's at the markets and $2 shops now that I've got this radio! As with all these sorts of radios, the headphone lead functions as the aerial. Supplied with this receiver were a pair of those awful "in-the-ear" type of miniature type earphones. Apart from the appalling sound quality, they are insensitive, unhygenic and dirty, fragile, and do not block out external sounds. So, I use the normal kind of headphones instead. The enclosure is all clipped together, and once I'd opened it, sure enough, a TDA7088T was visible. The audio amp appears to be one transistor; ie. single ended class A. I don't know what current it's drawing so I can't say whether it's consuming much more battery current than a class B amp would. In any case I would prefer AAA cells rather than the LR44's.




FM Radio with TDA7000
Category: FM Receivers

This project is a FM Radio based on TDA7000 and LM386 integrated circuits. What is unusual about TDA7000 IC is how it operates. It is a proper FM superhet receiver, with the usual local oscillator, mixer, IF amplifier, limiter, and phase detector. The difference is that there's only one tuned circuit; the local oscillator. Like the Pulse Counting Receiver, the TDA7000 relies on a low IF so that ordinary Op Amp circuitry can take care of the gain and bandpass characteristics. Only 70Kc/s is used with the TDA7000. Now, you might remember that the deviation of a broadcast FM signal is +/- 75Kc/s. A fully modulated signal would therefore sound rather distorted. So, how can this IC work? It's quite simple in that there is what Philips call a Frequency Locked Loop. Basically, the local oscillator is shifted in response to detector output so that the bandwidth of the mixer output is never more than +/- 15Kc/s. It is actually compressing the frequency range of the modulated signal. The muting or squelch feature is novel to say the least. Although it performs as any other muting circuit does, the TDA7000 provides an artificial noise generator so that the receiver still sounds alive while tuned off station. If you don't need that feature, just remove the .022uF condenser at pin 3. Not all Philips data sheets show it, but connecting a 10K resistor from the supply to pin 1 will disable the squelch.




FM Receivers
Category: FM Receivers

Here is how you make a superregenerative circuit. Choose a regenerative amplifier circuit configuration that requires more current during oscillations than when not oscillating. Adjust the regenerative amplifier to oscillate. Add a small circuit that uses the current of the amplifier to charge a capacitor while oscillations are taking place. Once the capacitor is charged, the voltage on the capacitor is used to kill the oscillations of the circuit. (Technically, the capacitor voltage shifts the operating point of the amplifier to reduce its gain and stop the oscillations.) When the oscillations stop, the capacitor discharges (through a resistor). Once the capacitor is discharged, the oscillations begin again.




FM Stereo Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

Let's begin by soldering a three-pin ceramic filter to the PCB. These three pins will be coming from terminals #11, #12 and #13 of the TEA5711T chip. Next, solder another three-pin ceramic filter to the PCB. These three pins will be coming from terminals #7, #8 and #9 of the TEA5711T chip. Once that is done, continue with another three-pin ceramic filter by snipping off the center pin on the ceramic filter. Then go ahead and solder it to the PCB. This filter will be coming from terminals #5 and #6 of the TEA5711T chip.




LA1800 FM Radio
Category: FM Receivers

3V superheterodyne FM receiver




One Transistor FM Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This radio is sensitive enough to tune 20 stations across the FM band, some with volume high enough to drive a small PM speaker. The ability to tune 88.9 MHz and 89.1 MHz is testimony of its selectivity. The signal-to noise ratio rivals that of the better walkman type radios.




Pocket Receiver with ZN414 & LM386
Category: FM Receivers

This device is very similar to the one being described in the previous project. The most important difference is that the LF signal exiting the ZN414 does not go to the transistor amplifier but to the power amplifier built around the LM386, which was used in some previous projects. Any other audio amplifier can be used instead, e.g. those on Pics.




Radio Receiver Circuit
Category: FM Receivers

This radio works with solar batteries that provide voltages between 0.5 and 2V. Microphones should be magnetic, high impedance (2k or more). The coil is wrapped around a ferrite rod 1 cm in diameter with 28AWG wire.




Simple FM Radio
Category: FM Receivers

This is one of my favorite radio builds just because of how simple it is and how well it is able to pick up a lot of FM radio stations. I have browsed the world in search of a one transistor FM receiver. I have seen a couple but they were always attached to some sort of added device, such as another IC or another transistor for amplification in the receiver itself. Through my continued quest of searching for that too good to be true one transistor, I happened to run across a super-regenerative receiver, by Charles Kitchin, famous for his vast knowledge of regenerative designs. I printed out the schematic and made it. It turned out extremely well.




Simple FM Radio Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This FM radio receiver circuit is very simple to build and is powered by just a single 1.5V battery cell. Receiver consists of a regenerative rf stage, TR1, followed by a two of three-stage audio amplifier, TR2 to TR4. In some areas 3 stages of audio amplification may not be necessary, in which case TR3 and its associated components can be omitted and the free end of capacitor C5 connected to the collector of TR2. The critical part of the fm radio receiver is the first stage, TR1/VC1, where the wirings must be kept as short as possible. Coil L1 is formed by winding 8 turns of 1mm (20 swg) enamelled copper wire on a 6 mm diameter former, which is then removed. After that L1 should be stretched carefully and evenly to a length of about 13mm.




Single Chip FM Receiver TDA7012
Category: FM Receivers

FM Radio Receiver IC TDA 7012T is very simple, but Radio This FM receiver has good sensitivity and selectivity. Single Chip TDA 7012T FM Receiver is to build an FM receiver requires a few additional components. Feature contained in FM receiver IC TDA 7012T is quite tempting to an FM receiver. Among features an FM receiver TDA 7012T is a low-voltage applications micro affability arrangement (MTS), Frequency Locked Loop (PLL) to 76 KHz range and selectivity of FM receiver with RC Filter. In an article by FM Radio Receiver IC TDA 7012T can be seen in the FM receiver circuit which can be made​​.




Small FM Radio
Category: FM Receivers

Perhaps this is one of the simplest and smallest FM Receiver that can receive the FM stations available locally. Its simple design makes it ideal for a pocket sized FM receiver. The output of the receiver drives a head phone.The circuit works off a small 4.5 volt battery or two 3.6 volt Lithium button cells.




Small FM Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

This is the most simple fm radio receiver with good performances that works great even if the sensitivity is not too high. The working principle of this fm receiver may seem a little unusual. It is made of an oscillator (T2 and T3) that is synchronized with the received frequency of T1. This transistor works as a broadband preamplifier in VHF range.




Super VXO
Category: FM Receivers

The Super VXO uses two X-tals of the identical nominal frequency in parallel instead of a single X-tal of a conventional VXO. Nothing else is special. It can pull considerably more frequencies than the conventional one. About 40kHz for a pair of 10.15MHz X-tals, and 90kHz for 13MHz, according to my experiences.




TDA7088 Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

The electronic diagram of the monophonic FM receiver made with TDA7088T is shown on Pic.4.12. If built with SMD components it can be placed in a matchbox, altogether with two button-type batteries. The operating principle of this device is given in the previous chapter. The only thing new is a very simple audio amplifier made with BC547 transistor, which is loaded by cheap 16-Ohm headphones. The telescopic antenna is used, as on Pic.4.8. Small mishap of this receiver is that it has no indication of station tuning. This problem can be solved by adding a small voltmeter in parallel to the BB909, whose scale is graduated in MHz.




TV Transmitter with Audio
Category: FM Receivers

If you are interested to build TV transmitter for your electronic project this Advanced TV Transmitter With Sound designed by Tetsuo Kogawa could be good idea for you.




VHF FM Aircraft Receiver
Category: FM Receivers

VHF FM Aircraft Receiver is a superregenative receiver developed for listening to FM transmitters but also tunes the aircraft band and the top portion of the FM broadcast band. Receives both AM and FM (107mHz to 135 MHz). You can use this receiver with the any FM transmitter. The receiver is amazingly simple using only one transistor for the receiver section and one IC for the audio section. This circuit is a self-quenching regenerative RF receiver also known as a superregenerative receiver. A superregenerative receiver performs two basic functions. First it feeds back a portion of the received signal from itís output in phase to its input; and second a super audible quenching oscillator drives the amplifier through the point of oscillation and maximum sensitivity and then quenches the oscillation repeatedly. This keeps the feedback from driving the circuit into self-oscillation and allows the signal to be regenerated over and over again. In this version of the circuit, both functions are performed by the circuitry associated with Q1. The rest of the circuit, shown to the right of L3 in the schematic, comprise the audio amplification circuit and are centered on the LM386 Audio Amp IC. In this configuration the LM386 is set at a gain of 200 and feeds itís output to a standard 1/8-inch diameter stereo phone jack. The audio can then be heard by plugging any standard stereo headset into the jack.




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